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PCMCH Strategies and Initiatives

At the core of individual, organizational and governmental initiatives and activities is Council’s commitment to improve access to care for all Ontarians, regardless of geography.

PCMCH’s health quality and improvement strategies and activities span the maternal/child/youth continuum of care and have a significant impact on the way in which health care is accessed by the public, and delivered, monitored, and evaluated by providers and the system-at-large.

Some of PCMCH’s strategies and initiatives are in the active phases of implementation and evaluation, while others are in the planning stages. Led by subject matter experts from across Ontario, PCMCH’s initiatives and projects are grounded in evidence, experience and a shared goal to improve the delivery and quality of care for mothers, babies, children and youth in Ontario.

ED Clinical Pathways

ED Clinical Pathways

The ED Clinical Pathways work group developed an evidence-based clinical pathway and decision support tools to guide and support the care of children and youth presenting to emergency departments with mental health conditions. It also developed a process to facilitate seamless transition to follow-up services with relevant community agencies.   Work Group Terms of Reference (PDF) Work Group Membership (PDF) Click here to view the abstract of a paper published in the July 2018 issue of Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, regarding this work.

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Emergency Department Paediatric Readiness

BACKGROUND Children requiring emergency care have unique needs that are typically very different than those of adult patients, especially when the need for care is serious or life-threatening in nature. Paediatric readiness among Emergency Departments (EDs) is critical to providing quality care for paediatric patients. As such, the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health (PCMCH), in partnership with TRanslating Emergency Knowledge for Kids (TREKK), has been leading the Emergency Department Paediatric Readiness (PED Readiness) initiative. This initiative includes the development and launch of an online readiness checklist, a recognized and validated tool which consists of a series of questions based on national guidelines. PCMCH’s work leverages two federally funded initiatives in the United States: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) Program and the National Paediatric Readiness Project (NPRP) survey. ABOUT THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PAEDIATRIC READINESS CHECKLIST The readiness survey (commonly referred to as “readiness checklist”), is a survey that is comprised of approximately 170 medical health and mental health related questions across the following domains: Demographics/Infrastructure Coordination of Patient Care ED Staffing and Training Quality Improvement & Patient Safety Policies and Procedures Paediatric Equipment or Supplies Challenges/Enablers The checklist is not prescriptive, nor does it instruct hospitals about what must be in place in order to see paediatric patients within their EDs. Instead, it provides an important mechanism for […]

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Paediatric Levels of Care

Paediatric Levels of Care (PLC) Background In Ontario, there are approximately 95 hospitals that care for paediatric inpatients. Of these hospitals, approximately 45 have dedicated paediatric units, with 5 academic centres that provide care to paediatric inpatients with high acuity, high medical and procedural complexity, and have a broad range of paediatric sub-subspecialists. As infants, children, and youths are not just ‘small adults’ and require care by those with specific paediatric skills and expertise, there is variation in admission criteria and specific services offered by hospitals across the province. While organizations have been able identify the specific services available at hospitals throughout the province for this population, Ontario has not had a universally accepted set of definitions and criteria for levels that define paediatric inpatient care with related standardized scope of service descriptions. In 2011, the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health (PCMCH) partnered with Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), now known as Ontario Health Interim and Transitional Regions, to implement standardized definitions of maternal and newborn levels of care across hospitals in Ontario. Recognizing that these levels aim to provide equitable access to care at the appropriate level for all pregnant women and newborns in Ontario, there was acknowledgement that implementing standardized definitions for the paediatric inpatient population would do the same. Together, these aim to enable a […]

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The Ontario Cleft Lip and Palate/Craniofacial Dental Program

One in every 700 infants in Ontario is born with a cleft of the lip and/or palate or other craniofacial difference. These conditions can be corrected through surgery, specialized dental treatment and speech therapy. To assist families of children and young adults who must cope with the expense of specialized dental treatment, the Ministry of Health provides funding for The Ontario Cleft Lip and Palate/Craniofacial Dental Program, managed by the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health. This program provides financial assistance for the specialized dental needs of affected individuals. Click here to learn more about the Ontario Cleft Lip and Palate/Craniofacial Dental Program.

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Transition to Adult Healthcare Services

Transition to Adult Healthcare Services

The transition to adult healthcare services is a process that begins prior to the actual transfer and does not stop once the transfer has occurred. Youth, their families, paediatric healthcare providers and adult healthcare providers all have an important role to play in the shared responsibility of patient care prior to and following the transfer of care. The goals of planned healthcare transitions are to ensure high-quality, developmentally appropriate, psychologically sound healthcare that is continuous, comprehensive and coordinated, before and throughout the transfer of youth into the adult system. In doing so, youth and their families can learn to advocate effectively for themselves, maintain good health behaviors and use healthcare services to maintain their health and prevent secondary disability.. The Transition to Adult Healthcare Services Work Group was convened in February 2012. Its mandate was to make recommendations to the Provincial Council for Maternal and Child Health regarding a provincial approach to the transition to adult services for youth with a chronic and/or complex clinical condition including physical, developmental and/or mental health conditions. The recommendations are intended to be generic rather than organization, geography and/or condition specific so that they can be adapted to each patient, patient population, the unique characteristics of an organization and the geographic area. Work Group Terms of Reference (PDF) Work Group Membership (PDF)

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